Hallelujah – Easter Version

“Hallelujah” is a song written by Canadian recording artist Leonard Cohen, originally released in 1984. Interpretations vary but most agree it is a commentary on broken love.

In 2006 Kelly Mooney, a Catholic musician from Rhode Island, wrote a set of lyrics adapted to Cohen’s original melody. In 2010 she secured the mechanical rights from Cohen’s publishers so that today we can now hear this most beautiful song about the greatest love story of all time. Click on the link below to hear this beautiful song.

Have a Blessed Easter!

[p.s. you might have to close any pop-up adds that may appear – sorry]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S1KjKnWr77M

 

Since the original posting, YouTube apparently has remove the Kelly Mooney video. Here is another version that contains the same lyrics:

Here are the lyrics:

A crown of thorns placed on His head
He knew that He would soon be dead
He said did you forget me Father did you?
They nailed Him to a wooden cross
Soon all the world would feel the loss
Of Christ the King before His Hallelujah

Hallelujah, hallelujah
Hallelujah, hallelujah

He hung His head and prepared to die
Then lifted His face up to the sky
Said I am coming home now Father to you
A reed which held His final sip
Was gently lifted to his lips
He drank His last and gave His soul to glory

Hallelujah, hallelujah
Hallelujah, hallelujah

The soldier who had used his sword
To pierce the body of our Lord
Said truly this is Jesus Christ our Savior
He looked with fear upon his sword
Then turned to face his Christ and Lord
Fell to his knees crying Hallelujah

Hallelujah, hallelujah
Hallelujah, hallelujah

Took from his head the thorny crown
And wrapped him in a linen gown
And laid him down to rest inside the tomb
The holes in his hands, his feet and side
Now in our hearts we know he died
To save us from ourselves oh hallelujah

Hallelujah, hallelujah
Hallelujah, hallelujah

Three days went by again they came
To move the stone to bless the slain
With oil and spice anointing hallelujah
But as they went to move the stone
They saw that they were not alone
But Jesus Christ has risen Hallelujah

Hallelujah, hallelujah
Hallelujah, hallelujah

Hallelujah, hallelujah
Hallelujah, hallelujah

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“Hallelujah” is a song written by Canadian recording artist Leonard Cohen, originally released in 1984. Interpretations vary but most agree it is a commentary on broken love.

5 thoughts on “Hallelujah – Easter Version”

      1. Dora,
        Yes I think this is totally appropriate for Mass. I have encouraged our music ministry to include it during holy week but so far no luck.
        Perhaps they have been told it is not acceptable but I have not heard that.
        Maybe you can forward to your parish and they could include it next year.
        Good luck and God bless!
        Tom

        1. It is not scriptural, according to the Bible it was a lance that pierced the side of Jesus and not the sword. Just because it’s titled “Easter Hallelujah” don’t give it the right to become part of the church liturgy.

          1. Gerald,
            Thanks for the comment but, really? You reject the beautiful Christian and Easter message of this song because of one word???

            Please consider this: When lyricists compose, they add language to the rhythms of music and poetry, both of which have certain constraints in structure and style. In this Easter version of Hallelujah, Kelly took the Biblical story of our Lords Passion and Death and melded it to the beautiful music of Leonard Cohen. In doing so, she may have taken certain liberties with certain words that are contain in Scripture but the result is a song that does in fact communicate the essence of Jesus’ Passion and Death and provides us a new, attractive, sacred and beautiful way to pray and workship.

            Lets take a look at the stanza the you criticized:

            The soldier who had used his sword
            To pierce the body of our Lord
            Said truly this is Jesus Christ our Savior
            He looked with fear upon his sword
            Then turned to face his Christ and Lord
            Fell to his knees crying Hallelujah

            Now, how appealing a song would this be if the words were changed to be perfectly in alignment with literal Scripture as you prefer:

            The soldier who had used his LANCE
            To pierce the body of our Lord
            Said truly this is Jesus Christ our Savior
            He looked with fear upon his LANCE
            Then turned to face his Christ and Lord
            Fell to his knees crying Hallelujah

            You see, this version is missing the flow and continuity of poetic rhymes and as such it stumbles and is awkward.
            Now you are correct that most Bible translations choose to use the word ‘spear’ or ‘lance’ instead of ‘sword’ to describe the instrument that pierced our Lord’s side. But do you really think the primary message of the Passion as described in Jn 19:33,34 was to describe the instrument as a lance that was used to pierce the side of Christ? I think it much more likely that the inspired message of these verses is that the OT prophesies were fulfilled stating that our Savior died without any bones being broken and that life-giving blood and water flowed from His sacrifice on the cross.

            I’m sorry that the use of the word sword was an unacceptable distraction. I’m sorry you missed the real message.

            Blessings
            Tom

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